Breiðafjörður Wilderness

 

One of Iceland’s three uncountable natural phonemes

 

Sailing, Flatey, Breidarfjordur, Iceland, Iceland Seaview, Arctiv SailingIt’s said that Iceland has three uncountable natural phonemes, which are the lakes in Arnarvatnsheiði, hills of Vatnsdalur and the islands of Breiðafjördur.

Exploration of Breiðafjörður islands is a 5 day long tour starting and ending in the friendly fisherman’s village Stykkishólmur which is located on the north eastern part of Snæfellsnes.

In this tour we will explore Breiðafjörður’s natural paradise and its islands, go ashore some places and enjoy the remote wild life.

After leaving Stykkishólmur we will sail around and have our first overnight stays at Dímonarklakkar, the second and third  in Flatey and finally the last night will be spend  in Elliðaey or Kumbaravogur. This might change since the tour is an exploration and we might find some other nice places to drop our anchor.

Breiðafjörður is famous for its wild life, many of those islands have crowded bird cliffs and we can expect to see a lot of different bird species, whales and seals.

In past centuries, many of the islands of Breiðarfjörður where inhabited, but nowadays the only one left is Flatey, having only five dwellers living there the whole year around.  The houses in the island are very beautiful and were all originally built around 1900. They’ve been well kept by their owners through the years and are all in their original shape, creating a charming and welcoming settlement that gives you a great experience of the past.

 

Day 1

Departure at 13:00 from Stykkishólmur Harbour. Then we head the northeast where Dímonarklakkar, our final destination for the day is. The island is a spectacular sightbeing the highest islands in the whole Breiðafjörður. On our way we will sail beneath some great bird cliffs with many excellent photogenic places for photographing the birds.  After 2-3 hours sailing we will anchor in the bay Dímonarvogur. Then we go ashore for a walk and hike up to  the highest part of the island (72m), a point where in good weather conditions we get an incredible view over the area.  This bay is famous for being the hiding place of Eiríkur Rauði (Erik the Red ) during the time when he was preparing his ship to escape Iceland after being doomed around the year 980 He ended up finding Greenland in his escape.

 

Sailing, Dimonarvogur, Breidafjordur, Iceland

Day 2

After breakfast and preferably a walk ashore, we start sailing between small islands and skeries to Flatey. On our way we will do some exploring and go ashore on some islands. Take our time to watch the bird life and cliffs on our way.  We might see some seals and whales on this route.

In the afternoon we will arrive in Flatey and anchor in Hafnarey (Harbour Island) which is located only few meters north of  Flatey.  Hafnarey is an island shaped like a horse shoe, offering an excellent shelter. It was used as a natural harbour for the fishingboats of local islanders in the old days.

Day 3

This day we will have some options open, we could for example do some hiking in Flatey, taking a closer look at the village, or we could sail around the island and explore it’s surroundings. This might also be a good day to try some fishing or make some combination of all three options.

Sailing, Flatey, Breidafjordur, Iceland, Iceland Seaview, Arctic SailingFlatey has a seasonal habitation; most of the houses there are only occupied during the summer. In winter, the island’s total population is five people. In spite of this, Flatey used to be one of the main cultural centers of Iceland, with it’s no-longer existing monastery (founded in 1172) standing on the highest point of the island as its beacon of knowledge.

There is only one  single road on the island, which leads from the Ferry dock to the so-called “old village”.

Sailing, Flatey, Breidafjordur, Iceland

Flatey has a beautiful Church, built in 1926. The church’s interior is painted with scenes from the history of Iceland through the centuries. It was painted by a Catalan painter in the 1960s, Baltasar Samper, who painted it in return for free accommodation when he was visiting the island. Now, the church bears the odd title of the oldest and smallest library in Iceland, established in 1864.

Day4

Elliðaey and Bjarnarhöfn

On day four we will departure Flatey and head south to Elliðaey which is the largest Puffin colony in Breiðarfjörður, holding over four thousands burrows in the soil. After exploring the puffin colony from sea, we will go ashore and walk around the island to take a look at the bird cliffs from above and visit the “Elliðaey Light house (built in 1951)”.

Sailing, Puffins, Breidafjordur, Iceland

After a stopover in Elliðaey we head for Barnarhöfn on the mainland which is on the south coast of Breiðafjörður. Near to Bjarnaröfn is the bay “Kumparavogur” where we will anchor overnight.

Bjarnarhöfn is a farm where the oldest shark production in Iceland can be found and that‘s also where the Museum of Sharks is located.  We will get a guided tour through the museum and see the preparation of shark meat, first hand, and of course try out he famous Icelandic shark along with the traditional Icelandic brennivín.

Day 5

After a nice breakfast we sail to Stykkishólmur where the trip will end around 13.00.

Dates:

26.05.2016 to 30.05.2016

02.06.2016 to 06.06.2016

09.06.2016 to 13.06.2016

16.06.2016 to 20.06.2016

23.06.2016 to 27.06.2016  –  sold out

30.06.2016 to 04.07.2016  –  sold out

08.07.2016 to 12.07.2016

14.07.2016 to 18.07.2016

To book a trip please send us e-mail to info@arcticsailing.is

* note that if non of those dates fits feel free to contact us and see if we can arrange a trip suiting your schedule.

* schedule might change due to weather and sea conditions.

Price 1.590 EUR

Included

  • Yacht costs
  • Services of guides and crew
  • All food whilst on board, except alcohol
  • Made up beds, soft and warm blankets and towels.

Not included

  • Personal clothing & equipment
  • Personal insurance

 

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